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Monthly Archives: August 2014

Quotation Friday!

“I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it at full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good. Hot is no good either. White hot and passionate is the only thing to be.” – Roald Dahl

 
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Posted by on August 29, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Review of “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt

9780316055437_custom-8387e636d286aa86fc16d49b6a17f95c8558d406-s6-c30I went on vacation last week and, as is usual for me and most travelers, brought a book with me to read on the plane.  It was a big, thick book that wouldn’t fit into my already over-stuffed purse, so I carried it around with me.  I was shocked when four different people commented on it. (See, the art of reading is assuredly not dead!)  It didn’t hurt that I had chosen this year’s Pulitzer Prize winner, “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt, to keep me occupied.  Everyone who talked to me said they had heard of the book and were excited to read it, and was I loving it?  I told them that yes, I was absolutely loving it.  I also said they should rush home and check it out from their local library (of course!) because they were in for a real treat.

Now, this book may not be for everyone.  If you like happy characters who make good choices, don’t read it.  Because it’s a rich character study of a man whose life is plagued with terrible decisions and even worse parental figures.  As a 13-year-old boy, Theo Decker is involved in an explosion at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.  In the explosion, his mother dies, and an old man, with his dying words, convinces Theo to take his ring and a famous painting (The Goldfinch) from the museum.  It is not an overstatement to say that those two actions will shape the rest of his life.  He is instructed to take the ring to a shop, where he meets a wonderful old man named Hobie, who becomes Theo’s friend and mentor.  There, he also meets the love of his life, Pippa, who he first spotted at the museum with her grandfather, the man who convinced Theo to take the painting.  Theo’s father isn’t in the picture anymore, so he is taken in by the very wealthy family of a school friend.  He learns to be content, but then his father reappears and takes him to Las Vegas with him and his new wife, Xandra.  The years in Las Vegas are not good to Theo – he essentially becomes addicted to alcohol and drugs and befriends a Ukrainian boy named Boris, who will play a major part in the novel much later.  Theo arrives back in New York with the painting and finds Hobie and Pippa again.  He reconnects with other old friends and makes a living in Hobie’s shop selling antiques.  Things come to a head when Boris comes back in his life.

The beauty of the novel lies in the struggle that Theo faces daily – between a path of self-destruction and a path to a normal, healthy life.  This is captured perfectly in the following passage from the novel:  “Only here’s what I really, really want someone to explain to me. What if one happens to be possessed of a heart that can’t be trusted–? What if the heart, for its own unfathomable reasons, leads one willfully and in a cloud of unspeakable radiance away from health, domesticity, civic responsibility and strong social connections and all the blandly-held common virtues and instead straight toward a beautiful flare of ruin, self-immolation, disaster?…If your deepest self is singing and coaxing you straight toward the bonfire, is it better to turn away? Stop your ears with wax? Ignore all the perverse glory your heart is screaming at you? Set yourself on the course that will lead you dutifully towards the norm – reasonable hours and regular medical check-ups, stable relationships and steady career advancement, the New York Times and brunch on Sunday, all with the promise of being somehow a better person? Or…is it better to throw yourself head first and laughing into the holy rage calling your name?”

It is a meaty book, and one that is worth the time it takes to get through.  I think in the next few years it will be considered a classic; perhaps college kids will read about Theo Decker in their English 101 classes.

 
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Posted by on August 27, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Quotation Friday!

From my very favorite book in the world, “How Green Was My Valley”:

“O, there is lovely to feel a book, a good book, firm in the hand, for its fatness holds rich promise, and you are hot inside to think of good hours to come.” – Richard Llewellyn

 
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Posted by on August 22, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Quotation Friday!

“There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man. True nobility is being superior to your former self.”  Ernest Hemingway

 
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Posted by on August 15, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Quotation Friday!

Possibly the ultimate quotation about what it is to be a reader:

“Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.” – Scout Finch in Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird

 
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Posted by on August 8, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Could you be. . . Divergent?!

91o13sPo7VLDivergent is the newest craze to hit teens and, let’s face it, adults. To coincide with the DVD release of the movie adaptation of the popular series, the Library has planned a Divergent party just for teens! We’ll be showing the movie (rated PG-13) on Thursday, August 7th at 2:00 p.m. On Thursday, August 14th at 3:00 p.m., teens are invited to our “Choosing Ceremony,” where you’ll find out to which faction you belong.  I took the test today, and I was pretty surprised by what my faction turned out to be.  Test results showed that someone on staff is actually Divergent, but I promised to keep her name hush hush.

If you’ve not read the “Divergent” books, I highly recommend starting the series. Like everything else in the YA world, it is a trilogy, but the good news is, they’ve all been published, so you won’t have to wait impatiently for the next installment. The books are filled with teen angst and love, but they’re much more than that. The series also deals with more serious issues like freedom of choice and corruption at top levels of government. They’re a great read if you’re looking for your next “Hunger Games” fix. I’m grateful to author Veronica Roth if for no other reason than we all know now what words like “abnegation” and “amity” mean. I always love authors who singlehandedly increase my vocabulary.

 
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Posted by on August 6, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Our Sponsors

Here is a list of our absolutely wonderful sponsors, to whom we are so grateful. They help us make summer reading club happen!

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Posted by on August 6, 2014 in Uncategorized

 
 
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